Autism Family Caregivers Act of 2022, H.R.6783 (PDF Avail.) | #AutismPolitics #BanABA

H.R.6783 – Autism Family Caregivers Act of 2022

To authorize the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration, to award grants for providing evidence-based caregiver skills training to caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities or delays, and for other purposes.


PDF of Bill

[Links below go to the government site]

Sponsor:Rep. Meng, Grace [D-NY-6] (Introduced 02/18/2022)
Committees:House – Energy and Commerce
02/18/2022Referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.
Action By: House of Representatives
02/18/2022Introduced in House
Action By: House of Representatives
CosponsorDate Cosponsored
Rep. Doyle, Michael F. [D-PA-18]*02/18/2022
Rep. Fitzpatrick, Brian K. [R-PA-1]*02/18/2022
Rep. Wild, Susan [D-PA-7]*02/18/2022
Rep. Suozzi, Thomas R. [D-NY-3]*02/18/2022
Rep. Veasey, Marc A. [D-TX-33]*02/18/2022
Rep. Raskin, Jamie [D-MD-8]*02/18/2022
Rep. Bacon, Don [R-NE-2]*02/18/2022
Rep. Dean, Madeleine [D-PA-4]*02/18/2022
Rep. Grijalva, Raúl M. [D-AZ-3]*02/18/2022
Rep. Pocan, Mark [D-WI-2]*02/18/2022
Rep. Clarke, Yvette D. [D-NY-9]*02/18/2022
Rep. Lee, Barbara [D-CA-13]*02/18/2022
Rep. Tlaib, Rashida [D-MI-13]*02/18/2022
Rep. Axne, Cynthia [D-IA-3]*02/18/2022
Rep. Moore, Gwen [D-WI-4]*02/18/2022
Rep. Matsui, Doris O. [D-CA-6]*02/18/2022
Rep. Deutch, Theodore E. [D-FL-22]*02/18/2022
Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-7]*02/18/2022
Rep. Hayes, Jahana [D-CT-5]*02/18/2022
Rep. Craig, Angie [D-MN-2]*02/18/2022
Rep. Harder, Josh [D-CA-10]02/28/2022
Rep. Cohen, Steve [D-TN-9]02/28/2022
Rep. Courtney, Joe [D-CT-2]03/01/2022
Rep. Garbarino, Andrew R. [R-NY-2]03/01/2022
Rep. Lowenthal, Alan S. [D-CA-47]03/01/2022
Del. Norton, Eleanor Holmes [D-DC-At Large]03/01/2022
Rep. Auchincloss, Jake [D-MA-4]03/03/2022
Rep. DeSaulnier, Mark [D-CA-11]03/07/2022
Rep. Ross, Deborah K. [D-NC-2]03/07/2022
Rep. Krishnamoorthi, Raja [D-IL-8]03/11/2022
Rep. Delgado, Antonio [D-NY-19]03/16/2022
Rep. Cleaver, Emanuel [D-MO-5]03/16/2022
Rep. Gallego, Ruben [D-AZ-7]
117th CONGRESS
2d Session

H. R. 6783

To authorize the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration, to award grants for providing evidence-based caregiver skills training to caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities or delays, and for other purposes.


IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

February 18, 2022

Ms. Meng (for herself, Mr. Michael F. Doyle of Pennsylvania, Mr. Fitzpatrick, Ms. Wild, Mr. Suozzi, Mr. Veasey, Mr. Raskin, Mr. Bacon, Ms. Dean, Mr. Grijalva, Mr. Pocan, Ms. Clarke of New York, Ms. Lee of California, Ms. Tlaib, Mrs. Axne, Ms. Moore of Wisconsin, Ms. Matsui, Mr. Deutch, Ms. Velázquez, Mrs. Hayes, and Ms. Craig) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce


A BILL

To authorize the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration, to award grants for providing evidence-based caregiver skills training to caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities or delays, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the “Autism Family Caregivers Act of 2022”.

SEC. 2. CAREGIVER SKILLS TRAINING PILOT PROGRAM.

(a) Authorization.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration, shall carry out a program, to be known as the Caregiver Skills Training Pilot Program, under which the Secretary shall award grants to eligible entities to provide evidence-based caregiver skills training to caregivers, including family caregivers, of children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities or delays, for the purposes of—

(1) improving the health outcomes and quality of life of such children and their caregivers; and

(2) teaching caregivers of such children evidenced-based intervention strategies to promote—

(A) improvement in the mental and physical well-being of such children and their caregivers; and

(B) the greater inclusion of such children in family and community life.

(b) Eligibility.—To be eligible to receive an award under subsection (a), an entity shall be—

(1) a nonprofit or other community-based organization;

(2) a Federally qualified health center;

(3) an academic health center;

(4) a health system; or

(5) a collaboration or consortium of 2 or more entities listed in paragraphs (1) through (4).

(c) Application.—To seek a grant under this section, an eligible entity shall submit to the Secretary an application that includes—

(1) a description of—

(A) the applicant’s experience delivering evidence-based caregiver skills training to caregivers, including family caregivers, of children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities or delays;

(B) the activities that the applicant proposes to carry out through the grant; and

(C) how such activities will achieve the purposes described in subsection (a); and

(2) a plan for—

(A) coordination with community-based organizations, State and local early intervention providers, Medicaid systems, schools, and other providers of early intervening services;

(B) collaboration with health care payors (including public and private insurance), State departments of insurance, health plans, and other relevant payors;

(C) expanding the skills training program proposed to be carried out through the grant; and

(D) achieving sustainability of such program.

(d) Selection Of Grantees.—

(1) SELECTION CRITERIA.—In awarding a grant to an eligible entity or a collaboration or consortium of 2 or more entities described in subsection (b), the Secretary shall require at least one of the recipients to—

(A) have at least 3 years of demonstrated experience—

(i) delivering evidence-based, culturally competent caregivers skills training programs described in subsection (a), including in medically underserved communities;

(ii) providing services to children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays and disabilities, as well as collaborating directly with their families;

(iii) providing individual caregiver coaching as part of skills training to caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays and disabilities; and

(iv) working with self-advocates or adults with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays and disabilities; and 

(B) demonstrate the ability to access resources from and collaborate with—

(i) health care providers;

(ii) allied health professionals;

(iii) educators;

(iv) social workers; and

(v) nonprofessional family caregivers who assist with daily living and developmental activities, including for children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays and disabilities.

(2) REDUCING DISPARITIES.—In awarding grants under this section, the Secretary may consider, as appropriate, the extent to which an eligible entity can deliver evidence-based, culturally competent caregivers skills training programs for children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays and disabilities from diverse racial, ethnic, geographic, or linguistic backgrounds.

(e) Use Of Funds.—The recipient of a grant under this section shall use the grant to provide—

(1) evidence-based caregiver skills training to caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorders or other developmental delays and disabilities; and

(2) such training in areas related to children’s learning and development, including—

(A) communication skills;

(B) social engagement;

(C) daily living skills; and

(D) caregiver response strategies to aggressive behavior.

(f) Requirements.—

(1) NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS AND STATES.—The Secretary shall award grants under subsection (a) to not fewer than 25 eligible entities in not fewer than 15 States.

(2) AMOUNT.—The total amount of each grant awarded under subsection (a) shall be not less than $500,000 over a 5-year period.

(g) Supplement Not Supplant.—Amounts made available to carry out this section shall be in addition to amounts made available to provide for—

(1) behavioral, medical, habilitative, and other services covered by the Medicaid program or private health insurance;

(2) services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.); or

(3) adaptations of a training program using evidence-based approaches to serve children of different ages, communities, and underrepresented groups.

(h) Caregiver Skills Training National Technical Assistance And Evaluation Center.—The Secretary, acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration, shall establish and operate a center, to be known as the Caregiver Skills Training National Technical Assistance and Evaluation Center, to—

(1) assist recipients of grants under subsection (a) in the implementation of caregiver skills training programs using lessons learned from other evidenced-based activities or caregiver programs conducted or supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration;

(2) assist such grant recipients in ensuring their programs assist medically underserved communities, when possible;

(3) assist such grant recipients in developing plans for achieving sustainability of their programs;

(4) collect and report on the effectiveness of practices adopted pursuant to grants under subsection (a);

(5) conduct an annual evaluation of activities funded through grants under subsection (a), in consultation with the grant recipients, including evaluation of the effectiveness of such grants at improving health outcomes and quality of life for children with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delays and disabilities and their family caregivers;

(6) convene national or regional meetings of such grant recipients to discuss best practices; and

(7) provide other assistance as needed to improve or carry out the program under this section.

(i) Reports.—

(1) INITIAL REPORT.—Not later than 6 months after awarding the first grant under subsection (a), the Secretary shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and to other appropriate congressional committees, a report on the implementation of this section. Such report shall include—

(A) how many grants have been awarded;

(B) the name and location of the grant recipients;

(C) the communities impacted by the grants;

(D) a description of the kind of activities to be carried out with the grants;

(E) an analysis, conducted by the Caregiver Skills Training National Technical Assistance and Evaluation Center in consultation with the recipients of grants under subsection (a), of the effectiveness of such grants at improving health outcomes and quality of life for children with autism or other developmental disabilities or delays and their family caregivers; and

(F) best practices, developed in consultation with the Caregiver Skills Training National Technical Assistance and Evaluation Center, to increase access to caregiver skills training programs described in subsection (a) in medically underserved communities.

(2) FINAL REPORT.—Not later than the end of fiscal year 2027, the Secretary shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and to other appropriate congressional committees, a final report on the implementation of this section, including—

(A) the information, analysis, and best practices listed in subparagraphs (A) through (F) of paragraph (1); and

(B) recommendations on how to expand and extend the program under this section.

(j) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) The term “family caregiver” means an adult family member or other individual who has a significant relationship with, and who provides a broad range of assistance to, a child between the ages of 0 and 9 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities or delays.

(2) The term “Federally qualified health center” has the meaning given the term in section 1861(aa) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1395x(aa)).

(3) The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Health and Human Services.

(k) Authorization Of Appropriations.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—To carry out this section, there is authorized to be appropriated $10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2023 through 2027.

(2) ALLOCATION FOR CENTER.—Of the amount authorized by paragraph (1) to be appropriated to carry out this section for a fiscal year, $450,000 shall be for establishing or operating the Caregiver Skills Training National Technical Assistance and Evaluation Center.


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Note/Warning:

Autistic people have fought the inclusion of ABA in therapy for us since before Autism Speaks, and other non-Autistic-led autism organizations, started lobbying legislation to get it covered by insurances and Medicaid. 

ABA is a myth originally sold to parents that it would keep their Autistic child out of an institution. Today, parents are told that with early intervention therapy their child will either be less Autistic or no longer Autistic by elementary school, and can be mainstreamed in typical education classes. ABA is very expensive to pay out of pocket. Essentially, Autism Speaks has justified the big price tag up front will offset the overall burden on resources for an Autistic’s lifetime. The recommendation for this therapy is 40 hours a week for children and toddlers.

The original study that showed the success rate of ABA to be at 50% has never been replicated. In fact, the study of ABA by United States Department of Defense was denounced as a failure. Not just once, but multiple times. Simply stated: ABA doesn’t workIn study after repeated study: ABA (conversion therapy) doesn’t work. 

What more recent studies do show: Autistics who experienced ABA therapy are at high risk to develop PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions. Historically, the autism organizations promoting ABA as a cure or solution have silenced Autistic advocates’ opposition. ABA is also known as gay conversion therapy.


The ‘cure’ for Autistics not born yet is the prevention of birth. 

The ‘cure’ is a choice to terminate a pregnancy based on ‘autism risk.’ The cure is abortion. This is the same ‘cure’ society has for Down Syndrome. 

This is eugenics 2021. Instead of killing Autistics and disabled children in gas chambers or ‘mercy killings’ like in Aktion T4, it’ll happen at the doctor’s office, quietly, one Autistic baby at a time. Different approaches yes, but still eugenics and the extinction of an entire minority group of people.


Fact: You can’t cure Autistics from being Autistic.

Fact: You can’t recover an Autistic from being Autistic.

Fact: You can groom an Autistic to mask and hide their traits. Somewhat. … however, this comes at the expense of the Autistic child, promotes Autistic Burnout (this should not be confused with typical burnout, Autistic Burnout can kill Autistics), and places the Autistic child at high risk for PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions.


[Note: Autism is NOT a disease, but a neurodevelopmental difference and disability.]


Fact: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism.


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