Archived | ReThink Autism: Key Components of an Effective School-Based Autism Program | Circa January 26, 2011 #NotAnAutisticAlly #AutisticHistory

[Note: Shared for #AutisticHistory archive purposes. This is NOT An Autistic Ally.]


NEW YORK, Jan. 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — An estimated 637,000 children ages 3-17 in the U.S. (or 1 in 91) had a current Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis in 2007 according to a widely accepted study(1) published in Pediatrics. That represents a 67% increase from a previous estimate by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network, which reported autism rates of 66 per 10,000 children (or 1 in 150) in 2002.

With such an alarming growth in the prevalence of autism, it is no surprise that public school districts nationwide are struggling to keep pace with the complex needs of a growing autism population. Students’ needs are usually addressed through the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) process, where educators propose specific programs and services while parents advocate for what they believe is best for their children on an individual basis. Often this puts schools and parents in an adversarial relationship, missing the “big picture” and the opportunity to create a program structure of best practices that have been proven effective in supporting students with autism.

As part of its commitment to the autism community, Rethink Autism (http://www.rethinkautism.com) is offering a free online webinar, “Key Components Of An Effective School-Based Autism Program,” for school district leaders, teachers and parents on Wednesday, Feb. 2 at 1p EST / 12p CST and Tuesday, Feb. 8 at 3p EST / 2p CST, presented by Jamie Pagliaro, who is the Executive VP at Rethink Autism and Founding Executive Director, NY Center for Autism Charter School.

The webinar will identify seven key components that research and practitioners agree are necessary to effectively support students with autism. It will provide a framework for district leaders to allocate resources, for teachers to coordinate direct services, and for parents to advocate, in a collaborative effort to improve supports for students on the autism spectrum.

This free online webinar is open to anyone with Internet access – parents and professionals – but capacity is limited so registration is required to attend (at http://www.rethinkautism.com). In its Expert Access webinar series, Rethink Autism connects the autism community with leading experts to share knowledge and perspectives on a variety of important topics.

Rethink Autism’s unique web-based program provides teachers with a comprehensive evidence-based curriculum through 1200+ video-based teaching steps, parent and staff training modules, an assessment tool, and progress tracking features. The curriculum, endorsed by leaders in the field of autism treatment and research, spans the entire autism spectrum and covers a broad range of skills, including academics, language, social, motor, daily living, and behavior managements.

About Rethink Autism (http://www.rethinkautism.com)

Rethink Autism, Inc. seeks to ensure that every child on the autism spectrum has access to effective and affordable evidence-based treatment options by providing professionals, parents, and family members with the tools and information necessary to teach children with autism in a way that is easy to understand and apply. Rethink Autism was founded in 2007 and has its headquarters at 19 West 21st Street in New York City.

Notes:

(1) “The Prevalence of Parent-Reported Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children in the United States, 2007,” Oct. 5 2009 issue of Pediatrics.

Contact: 
Jamie Pagliaro 
Executive Vice President, Rethink Autism
jamie@rethinkautism.com
ph: 646-257-2919


Note/Warning:

Autistic people have fought the inclusion of ABA in therapy for us since before Autism Speaks, and other non-Autistic-led autism organizations, started lobbying legislation to get it covered by insurances and Medicaid. 

ABA is a myth originally sold to parents that it would keep their Autistic child out of an institution. Today, parents are told that with early intervention therapy their child will either be less Autistic or no longer Autistic by elementary school, and can be mainstreamed in typical education classes. ABA is very expensive to pay out of pocket. Essentially, Autism Speaks has justified the big price tag up front will offset the overall burden on resources for an Autistic’s lifetime. The recommendation for this therapy is 40 hours a week for children and toddlers.

The original study that showed the success rate of ABA to be at 50% has never been replicated. In fact, the study of ABA by United States Department of Defense was denounced as a failure. Not just once, but multiple times. Simply stated: ABA doesn’t workIn study after repeated study: ABA (conversion therapy) doesn’t work. 

What more recent studies do show: Autistics who experienced ABA therapy are at high risk to develop PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions. Historically, the autism organizations promoting ABA as a cure or solution have silenced Autistic advocates’ opposition. ABA is also known as gay conversion therapy.


The ‘cure’ for Autistics not born yet is the prevention of birth. 

The ‘cure’ is a choice to terminate a pregnancy based on ‘autism risk.’ The cure is abortion. This is the same ‘cure’ society has for Down Syndrome. 

This is eugenics 2021. Instead of killing Autistics and disabled children in gas chambers or ‘mercy killings’ like in Aktion T4, it’ll happen at the doctor’s office, quietly, one Autistic baby at a time. Different approaches yes, but still eugenics and the extinction of an entire minority group of people.


Fact: You can’t cure Autistics from being Autistic.

Fact: You can’t recover an Autistic from being Autistic.

Fact: You can groom an Autistic to mask and hide their traits. Somewhat. … however, this comes at the expense of the Autistic child, promotes Autistic Burnout (this should not be confused with typical burnout, Autistic Burnout can kill Autistics), and places the Autistic child at high risk for PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions.


[Note: Autism is NOT a disease, but a neurodevelopmental difference and disability.]


Fact: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism.


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