Archived | ReThink Autism: Autism Action Partnership Announces Statewide Initiative to Improve Outcomes for Students with ASD in Nebraska Public Schools | Circa March 21, 2011 #NotAnAutisticAlly #AutisticHistory

[Note: Shared for #AutisticHistory archive purposes. This is NOT An Autistic Ally.]


Autism Action Partnership Announces Statewide Initiative to Improve Outcomes for Students with ASD in Nebraska Public Schools

OMAHA, Neb., March 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Autism Action Partnership (AAP), a public nonprofit foundation, announced a statewide initiative to improve outcomes for students with autism in Nebraska public schools. Through an innovative partnership with the Department of Education’s Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Network, AAP is providing support to Nebraska public schools using a scalable technology solution developed by Rethink Autism.

“The number of children with autism ages 3-21 in Nebraska jumped about 339% from 2000 to 2009 [according to a report from Easter Seals]. This dramatic increase has presented significant challenges for our public school system. Autism Action Partnership learned of the critical work being done by the ASD Network to provide high-quality training and support throughout the state. Together, we explored technology as an option to complement the Network’s existing efforts and broaden their reach. Rethink Autism offered an ideal solution, and the success of our initial pilot has compelled us to do more,” said Gail Durkin, Executive Director of Autism Action Partnership and architect of the plan.

Developed by leading clinicians and researchers from around the country, Rethink Autism offers a web-based platform for training, individualized programming, and student data tracking. The system includes a comprehensive curriculum with over 1,200 video demonstrations, which show parents and teachers how to implement research-based teaching strategies utilizing the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). ABA is widely recognized as the treatment for autism with the most research supporting its efficacy.

Parents, teachers, and district leaders – including those who participated in the pilot – are encouraged to visit the Autism Action Partnership website to download a copy of the Rethink Autism Application for the 2011-12 school year. (See “News from Autism Action Partnership” on the homepage: http://www.autismaction.org.)

Districts will be notified in late spring, and invited to participate in an initial orientation over the summer. Additional technical assistance sessions will be offered throughout the school year as part of the initiative. More information and copies of the application will also be available at the ASD Network’s 8th Annual Conference, which is being held April 7-8 at the Embassy Suites in La Vista. Representatives from Autism Action Partnership and Rethink Autism will be available at the ASD Network’s annual conference to answer any questions.

The idea behind AAP’s statewide initiative was tested in a pilot program this past year that far exceeded expectations. The pilot program was conducted in over 25 districts that participated in the ASD Network’s S.T.E.P.S. ASD program (a year-long intensive training program that involves both teachers and district leaders). In addition to receiving professional development and coaching from the Network’s regional coordinators, participants were trained to implement the Rethink Autism program with specific students. The goal was to equip districts with a tool-kit that would allow them to apply what they were learning back in the classrooms, thus creating a more sustainable model for autism support.

“The pilot program with Autism Action Partnership and Rethink Autism has been very successful. Rethink Autism is an innovative program that has helped us put the essential components of an evidence-based program for individuals with autism at the fingertips of educators across the state. The Rethink Autism program reinforces the teaching components we cover during our trainings. It’s been tremendously beneficial to provide this resource to educators who are committed to providing quality educational services to individuals with autism spectrum disorders,” said Annette Wragge, the State Coordinator for the NE ASD Network.

Teachers reported high levels of satisfaction with the user-friendliness of Rethink Autism’s technology platform, and district leaders were pleased with the focus on data and research-based strategies. Results across participants verified that most teachers consistently used the program and, more importantly, students met their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals. Jamie Lewis, an Educational Consultant in ESU #10, sums it up best: “It is often difficult to work in rural areas given the limited access to specialists … Rethink Autism is starting to level the playing field!”

About Autism Action Partnership (http://www.autismaction.org)

Autism Action Partnership is a non-profit that promotes autism awareness and provides resource to families and professionals in Nebraska and southwest Iowa whose lives are touched by the disorder. Parents are invited to visit the Autism Action Partnership online resource center to learn about the signs of autism, questions to ask and the best professionals in their area.

About the NE ASD Network (http://www.unl.edu/asdnetwork)

The Nebraska ASD Network is committed to building and enhancing the capacity of Nebraska schools in providing quality, individualized, educational services to children on the autism spectrum. The network provides training and consultative assistance to educational teams across the state. Additionally, through the annual State ASD Conference, Regional ASD Workshops, S.T.E.P.S and District Trainings the NE ASD network ensures that school, families, and community members have up-to-date information on autism spectrum disorders.

About Rethink Autism (http://www.rethinkautism.com)

Rethink Autism, Inc. seeks to ensure that every child on the autism spectrum has access to effective and affordable evidence-based treatment options by providing professionals, parents, and family members with the tools and information necessary to teach children with autism in a way that is easy to understand and apply. Rethink Autism was founded in 2007 and has its headquarters at 19 West 21st Street in New York City.

Contacts: 

Gail Durkin
Executive Director, Autism Action Partnership
gdurkin@autismaction.org
ph: 402-496-7200

Jamie Pagliaro 
Executive Vice President, Rethink Autism
jamie@rethinkautism.com
ph: 646-257-2919



Note/Warning:

Autistic people have fought the inclusion of ABA in therapy for us since before Autism Speaks, and other non-Autistic-led autism organizations, started lobbying legislation to get it covered by insurances and Medicaid. 

ABA is a myth originally sold to parents that it would keep their Autistic child out of an institution. Today, parents are told that with early intervention therapy their child will either be less Autistic or no longer Autistic by elementary school, and can be mainstreamed in typical education classes. ABA is very expensive to pay out of pocket. Essentially, Autism Speaks has justified the big price tag up front will offset the overall burden on resources for an Autistic’s lifetime. The recommendation for this therapy is 40 hours a week for children and toddlers.

The original study that showed the success rate of ABA to be at 50% has never been replicated. In fact, the study of ABA by United States Department of Defense was denounced as a failure. Not just once, but multiple times. Simply stated: ABA doesn’t workIn study after repeated study: ABA (conversion therapy) doesn’t work. 

What more recent studies do show: Autistics who experienced ABA therapy are at high risk to develop PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions. Historically, the autism organizations promoting ABA as a cure or solution have silenced Autistic advocates’ opposition. ABA is also known as gay conversion therapy.


The ‘cure’ for Autistics not born yet is the prevention of birth. 

The ‘cure’ is a choice to terminate a pregnancy based on ‘autism risk.’ The cure is abortion. This is the same ‘cure’ society has for Down Syndrome. 

This is eugenics 2021. Instead of killing Autistics and disabled children in gas chambers or ‘mercy killings’ like in Aktion T4, it’ll happen at the doctor’s office, quietly, one Autistic baby at a time. Different approaches yes, but still eugenics and the extinction of an entire minority group of people.


Fact: You can’t cure Autistics from being Autistic.

Fact: You can’t recover an Autistic from being Autistic.

Fact: You can groom an Autistic to mask and hide their traits. Somewhat. … however, this comes at the expense of the Autistic child, promotes Autistic Burnout (this should not be confused with typical burnout, Autistic Burnout can kill Autistics), and places the Autistic child at high risk for PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions.


[Note: Autism is NOT a disease, but a neurodevelopmental difference and disability.]


Fact: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism.


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