Will @AutismSpeaks Maintain Their Partnership with Kellogg Or Will They Support Employee Rights And Humane Working Conditions?  | Eve Reiland #ActuallyAutistic #KelloggStrike


Will Autism Speaks Maintain Their Partnership with Kellogg Or Will They Support Employee Rights And Humane Working Conditions?

It seems Kellogg is problematic for more than just the Autistic community with their partnership with Autism Speaks.

Currently Kellogg is in the news for deplorable employee conditions, forced overtime, forced use of vacation days instead of sick time and now, when they are incredibly profitable, are looking at pay cuts and benefit reductions for their employees. The employees are now on strike.

How many Autistics are impacted by this who work for Kellogg? How many of these employees forced to work 7-days a week are also parents of Autistic children? What about all of Kellogg’s employees that were so badly treated while ’sensory love notes’ was being produced?

Autism Speaks: What are you going to do to support the employees of Kellogg?

Unfortunately, that’s not all that’s troubling with Kellogg. Way back in 2009 they landed in some hot water with the FTC for subscribing health benefits to their products that had no scientific backing. Not once, but twice.

Good thing the FTC stepped in before Kellogg’s could boast their products could “cure autism” or “recover Autistics.” Unfortunately, the FTC didn’t catch Kellogg’s claim their cereal was “clinically shown to improve kids’ attentiveness by 20%” until after the boxes were stocked store shelves.

FYI: Rice Krispies is allowed on the parent-led autism organization’s promoted GFCF diet. A fabulous partnership with Autism Speaks to cash in on autism myth.

Will Autism Speaks continue their partnership knowing these ’treats’ aren’t so love-filled and sweet as they think? Or will they call to their parent ’warriors’ to support the employees on strike and demand more humane, legal and responsible treatment?

Or will Autism Speaks pull the usual cold shoulder and ignore the entire event and pretend it doesn’t exist? You know, just like they’ve done with us Autistics all these years.

Hmmmm. Guess only time will tell.


#KelloggStrike | FTC Action | Kellogg’s False Adverts


#KelloggStrike

NEW: The workers who make Rice Krispies & Froot Loops are on strike at all Kellogg’s U.S. cereal plants

More Perfect Union

They work 16-hour forced overtime shifts and 7-day work weeks, sometimes up to 120 days straight.

Now, amid record profits, Kellogg’s wants to cut their pay & benefits.

Via Twitter @MorePerfectUs

You can help support the striking Kellogg’s workers by donating to their strike funds herehttps://msha.ke/bctgm/


05 Oct Workers at Kellogg’s Cereal Production Plants Are on Strike

Posted at 11:21h in BCTGM

Press Release, Kellogg Strike, Press by bctgm

Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union (BCTGM) President Anthony Shelton issued the following statement in support of 1,400 BCTGM members in Battle Creek, Mich. (Local 3G), Omaha, Neb. (Local 50G), Lancaster, Pa. (Local 374G) and Memphis, Tenn. (Local 252G) who are on strike against the Kellogg Company:

“The BCTGM International Union stands in unwavering Solidarity with our courageous Brothers and Sisters who are on strike against the Kellogg Company. 

“For more than a year throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Kellogg workers around the country have been working long, hard hours, day in and day out, to produce Kellogg ready-to-eat cereals for American families. 

“Kellogg’s response to these loyal, hardworking employees has been to demand these workers give up quality health care, retirement benefits, and holiday and vacation pay. The company continues to threaten to send additional jobs to Mexico if workers do not accept outrageous proposals that take away protections that workers have had for decades.

“Kellogg is making these demands as they rake in record profits, without regard for the well-being of the hardworking men and women who make the products that have created the company’s massive profits. 

“We are proud of our Kellogg members for taking a strong stand against this company’s greed and we will support them for as long as it takes to force Kellogg to negotiate a fair contract that rewards them for their hard work and dedication and protects the future of all Kellogg workers.”

BCTGM members in Battle Creek, Omaha, Lancaster and Memphis produce Kellogg ready-to-eat cereals including: Rice Krispies, Raisin Bran, Froot Loops, Corn Flakes and Frosted Flakes.

Source: https://bctgm.org/2021/10/05/workers-at-kelloggs-cereal-production-plants-are-on-strike/


Find more on social media with #KelloggStrike

Kellogg’s strike: 1,400 cereal factory workers hit picket lines

October 6, 2021

New York (CNN Business)Workers at the Kellogg Company — maker of breakfast staples such as Corn Flakes and Rice Krispies — are on strike, after yearlong negotiations between union and management broke down. The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union said in a press release Tuesday that 1,400 of its members in the company’s hometown of Battle Creek, Michigan, as well as Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Omaha and Memphis, hit the picket lines Tuesday morning. The union indicated workers in these cities produce Rice Krispies, Raisin Bran, Froot Loops, Corn Flakes and Frosted Flakes.

Read full article here >


Rice Krispies’ personalized packaging looks to spread love as kids face uncertain school year

Aug. 21, 2020

Dive Brief:

  • Rice Krispies Treats launched a back-to-school campaign that encourages parents to give their kids a little extra love in moments of separation, which could feel amplified during the coronavirus pandemic, according to details shared with Marketing Dive.
  • The Kellogg-owned snack brand created limited-edition “Love in Case of” kits that feature wrappers parents can write messages of support on for their kids as they head into a particularly uncertain school year. The cases are available exclusively through KelloggStore.com, and Rice Krispies Treats will donate $20 to the nonprofit No Kid Hungry for each kit purchased between Aug. 20 – Sept. 30.
  • As part of the effort, Rice Krispies Treats partnered with Lori Gottlieb, therapist and author of “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone,” to create tips for parents on how to communicate with their kids this year. The brand is also working with actress Vanessa Lachey, who shared how she is using the kits to stay connected to her children.

Read full story here >>


Kellogg Slapped Again For Exaggerated Health Claims

June 4, 2010

SCOTT HENSLEY

We’re not sure how many people really ever believed that Rice Krispies are some sort of super-duper health food.

NPR

Are you buying this?

But cereal maker Kellogg sure tried to make that case, saying right on the front of the box that the toasted-rice cereal “now helps support your child’s immunity,” with “25 percent Daily Value of Antioxidants and Nutrients – Vitamins A, B, C, and E.” And on the back, if you got that far, the company trumpeted that the cereal “has been improved to include antioxidants and nutrients that your family needs to help them stay healthy.”

Not so fast, said the Federal Trade Commission, which for the second time in a year has stepped in to curb allegedly unsubstantiated, misleading health claims by Kellogg.

Read Full Article on NPR >>


Rice Krispies Are No Substitute For Swine Flu Vaccine

November 5, 2009

MAGGIE MERTENS

Cereal giant Kellogg said it’s dropping the eyebrow-raising claim that a box of Rice Krispies or Cocoa Krispies, “Now helps support your child’s IMMUNITY.” (The caps are Kellogg’s.)

NPR

Blame the swine flu. Kellogg’s said Wednesday it is discontinuing the IMMUNITY claim, “given the public attention on H1N1.”

The decision also follows a pullback by a controversial industry-sponsored program that put “Smart Choices” labels on the front of packages of processed foods, including some of Kellogg’s. Only days before that change, the Food and Drug Administration raised concerns those labels could mislead consumers.

The immunity claim for the two varieties of Krispies drew a lot of fire. The San Francisco city attorney challenged Kellogg last week to prove its claim, USA Today reported.

Though conceding, Kellogg didn’t admit complete defeat. The company stands by its claim that the amount of vitamins A, B, C and E found in the cereal are proven by “science” to help support the immune system.

Read full story on NPR >>


False Advertising Action Taken

Screenshot of FTC.gov for the Kellogg’s Case. Link to text and full page below.

Source: https://www.ftc.gov/enforcement/cases-proceedings/082-3145/kellogg-company-matter



Image of Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereal box with immunity claim.

Kellogg settles Rice Krispies false ad case

By Saundra Young
CNN Senior Medical Producer

June 4th, 2010

For the second time in a year, cereal giant Kellogg is settling false advertising charges from the Federal Trade Commission. The FTC announced that the leading cereal maker’s claims that Rice Krispies boosts a child’s immunity with “25 percent Daily Value of Antioxidants and Nutrients – Vitamins A, B, C and E” were “dubious” and ordered the company to discontinue all advertising stating such. Kellogg has agreed to the order.

Last April, the Kellogg Company settled FTC charges over false advertising claims for another popular breakfast cereal Frosted Mini-Wheats. The national ad campaign claimed the cereal was clinically shown to improve kids’ attentiveness by nearly 20 percent. The FTC found the clinical studies actually showed that only half the children who ate the cereal had improved attentiveness and that very few–only 1 in 9 – were 20 percent more attentive. That settlement barred Kellogg from making these claims, and from misrepresenting test results in any breakfast or snack food products.

“We expect more from a great American company than making dubious claims – not once, but twice – that its cereals improve children’s health,” said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz. “Next time, Kellogg needs to stop and think twice about the claims it’s making before rolling out a new ad campaign, so parents can make the best choices for their children.”

Now the FTC’s is modifying its original order and barring Kellogg from making any misleading or unsubstantiated health-related claims about any of the food products the company  sells –unless there is scientific evidence to back those claims.

“What is particularly disconcerting to us,” said FTC Commissioner Julie Brill, “Is that at the same time Kellogg was making promises to the commission regarding Frosted Mini-Wheats, the company was preparing to make problematic claims about Rice Krispies”

Kellogg released a statement: “Kellogg Company has a long history of responsible advertising. We stand behind the validity of our product claims and research, so we agreed to an order that covers those claims. We believe that the revisions to the existing consent agreement satisfied any remaining concerns.”

The company has signed the FTC order, which is just like a court order and is legally binding. If the order is violated in any way, the company could be fined up to $16,000 per violation. The definition of violation can vary, for example, from every time a commercial airs touting these claims, to every box of cereal that remains of the shelf containing the potentially misleading wording. The FTC says violations can often lead to hundreds of millions of dollars in penalties. Companies are required to provide information on how they are complying with the Agency’s Bureau of Consumer Protection’s Enforcement Division, which is constantly checking to see whether companies are complying with FTC orders.

Read article here >>


Kellogg to Restrict Ads to Settle US Investigation

Image of Kellogg’s Cocoa Krispies cereal box with Immunity claim.

By Sewell Chan

June 3, 2010

WASHINGTON — Maybe it should have just stuck with Snap, Crackle and Pop.

The Kellogg Company has agreed to advertising restrictions to resolve an investigation into its claims about the health benefits of its Rice Krispies cereal, the Federal Trade Commission said on Thursday.

The agreement expands on a settlement order that Kellogg agreed to last July over similar claims that another cereal, Frosted Mini-Wheats, was “clinically shown to improve kids’ attentiveness by nearly 20 percent.” 

Read post here >>


Screenshot of Kellogg’s press release about discontinued Immunity Statements on Rice Krispies boxes. Full text below.

Kellogg Company Discontinues Immunity Statements On Rice Krispies Cereals

PRNewswire

BATTLE CREEK, Mich.(:K)

BATTLE CREEK, Mich., Nov. 4 2009 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — Kellogg Company today announced its decision to discontinue the immunity statements on Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereals. 

Last year, Kellogg Company started the development of adding antioxidants to Rice Krispies cereals. This is one way the Company responded to parents indicating their desire for more positive nutrition in kids’ cereal. 

While science shows that these antioxidants help support the immune system, given the public attention on H1N1, the Company decided to make this change. The communication will be on pack for the next few months as packaging flows through store shelves. We will, however, continue to provide the increased amounts of vitamins A, B, C and E (25% Daily Value) that the cereal offers. 

We will continue to respond to the desire for improved nutrition, and we are committed to communicating the importance of nutrition to our consumers.

SOURCE: Kellogg Company

Web site:  http://www.kelloggcompany.com/


Critics blast Kellogg’s claim that cereals can boost immunity

November 2, 2009

By Bruce Horovitz, USA TODAYKellogg, the nation’s largest cereal maker, is being called to task by critics who object to the swine flu-conscious claim now bannered in bold lettering on the front of Cocoa Krispies cereal boxes: “Now helps support your child’s IMMUNITY.”

Of all claims on cereal boxes, “this one belongs in the hall of fame,” says Kelly Brownell, director of Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. “By their logic, you can spray vitamins on a pile of leaves, and it will boost immunity.”

Read full story >>


FTC Approves Final Consent Order in Matter Concerning Kellogg Company

July 31, 2009

Following a public comment period, the Commission has approved a final consent order in the matter of Kellogg Company and authorized the staff to provide responses to the commenters of record. The FTC’s complaint charged that Kellogg’s advertising claims touting a breakfast of Frosted Mini-Wheats as “clinically shown to improve kids’ attentiveness by nearly 20%” were false and violated federal law. 

The Commission vote approving the final order was 4-0. (FTC File No. 082-3145; the staff contact is Kial S. Young, Bureau of Consumer Protection, 202-326-3525; see press release dated April 20, 2009, at http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2009/04/kellogg.shtm.)

Copies of the documents mentioned in this release are available from the FTC’s Web site at http://www.ftc.gov and from the FTC’s Consumer Response Center, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20580. Call toll-free: 1-877-FTC-HELP.(FYI 37.2009.wpd)

CONTACT INFORMATION

MEDIA CONTACT: Office of Public Affairs
202-326-2180


FTC Investigation of Ad Claims that Rice Krispies Benefits Children’s Immunity Leads to Stronger Order Against Kellogg

June 3, 2010

Leading cereal maker Kellogg Company has agreed to new advertising restrictions to resolve a Federal Trade Commission investigation into questionable immunity-related claims for Rice Krispies cereal. This is the second time in the last year that the FTC has taken action against the company.

“We expect more from a great American company than making dubious claims – not once, but twice – that its cereals improve children’s health,” said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz. “Next time, Kellogg needs to stop and think twice about the claims it’s making before rolling out a new ad campaign, so parents can make the best choices for their children.”

Kellogg has agreed to expand a settlement order that was reached last year after the FTC alleged that the company made false claims that its Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal was “clinically shown to improve kids’ attentiveness by nearly 20%.”

At about the same time that Kellogg agreed to stop making these kinds of false claims in its cereal ads, the company began a new advertising campaign promoting the purported health benefits of Rice Krispies, according to the FTC. On product packaging, Kellogg claimed that Rice Krispies cereal “now helps support your child’s immunity,” with “25 percent Daily Value of Antioxidants and Nutrients – Vitamins A, B, C, and E.” The back of the cereal box stated that “Kellogg’s Rice Krispies has been improved to include antioxidants and nutrients that your family needs to help them stay healthy.”

Under the original settlement order covering Frosted Mini-Wheats, Kellogg was barred from making claims about the benefits to cognitive health, process, or function provided by any cereal or any morning food or snack food unless the claims were true and substantiated. 

The expanded order against Kellogg prohibits the company from making claims about any health benefit of any food unless the claims are backed by scientific evidence and not misleading. 

The Commission vote to modify the 2009 settlement order was 5-0, with Commissioner Julie Brill and Chairman Jon Leibowitz issuing a separate joint concurring statement. “As a trusted, long-established company with a presence in millions of American homes, Kellogg must not shirk its responsibility to do the right thing when it advertises the food we feed our children,” they wrote in the statement, which can be found on the FTC’s website and as a link to this press release at: http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/0823145/100602kelloggstatement.pdf.

Copies of the expanded order and related documents can be found on the FTC’s website and also are available from the FTC’s Consumer Response Center, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20580. 

NOTE: A consent agreement is for settlement purposes only and does not constitute an admission of a law violation. When the Commission issues a consent order on a final basis, it carries the force of law with respect to future actions. Each violation of such an order may result in a civil penalty of up to $16,000.

The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 1,800 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics. (FTC Docket No. C-4262)
(Kellogg.final)

CONTACT INFORMATION

MEDIA CONTACT: Mitchell J. Katz
Office of Public Affairs

202-326-2161STAFF CONTACT:Heather Hippsley or Shira Modell
Bureau of Consumer Protection
202-326-3285 or -3116


Kellogg Settles FTC Charges That Ads for Frosted Mini-Wheats Were False

April 20, 2009

Kellogg Company, the world’s leading producer of cereal, has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that advertising claims touting a breakfast of Frosted Mini-Wheats as “clinically shown to improve kids’ attentiveness by nearly 20%” were false and violated federal law. The proposed settlement bars deceptive or misleading cognitive health claims for Kellogg’s breakfast foods and snack foods and bars the company from misrepresenting any tests or studies.

According to the FTC’s complaint, Kellogg claimed in a national advertising campaign – including television, print, and Internet advertising, as well as product packaging – that a breakfast of Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal is clinically shown to improve children’s attentiveness by nearly 20 percent. The complaint alleges that, in fact, according to the clinical study referred to in Kellogg’s advertising, only about half the children who ate Frosted Mini-Wheats for breakfast showed any improvement in attentiveness, and only about one in nine improved by 20 percent or more. 

The complaint also challenges the claim, made in a different television ad, that a breakfast of Frosted Mini-Wheats was clinically shown to improve children’s attentiveness by nearly 20 percent when compared to children who ate no breakfast. In fact, the study showed that the children who ate the cereal for breakfast averaged just under 11 percent better in attentiveness, by comparison, and that relatively few were nearly 20 percent more attentive. Based on the clinical study results, the complaint alleges that both of the challenged claims are false and violate the FTC Act.

“We tell consumers that they should deal with trusted national brands,” said Chairman Jon Leibowitz. “So it’s especially important that America’s leading companies are more ‘attentive’ to the truthfulness of their ads and don’t exaggerate the results of tests or research. In the future, the Commission will certainly be more attentive to national advertisers.” 

The proposed settlement would bar Kellogg from making comparable claims about Frosted Mini-Wheats unless the claims are true and not misleading. It requires that claims about the benefits to cognitive health, process, or function provided by Frosted Mini-Wheats or any morning food or snack food be substantiated and true. The settlement would prohibit Kellogg from misrepresenting the results of tests, studies, or research regarding any morning or snack food product. Finally, the settlement contains standard record-keeping provisions to allow the agency to monitor compliance. 

The Commission vote to approve the administrative complaint and proposed consent agreement was 4-0. The FTC will publish an announcement regarding the agreement in the Federal Register shortly. The agreement will be subject to public comment for 30 days, beginning today and continuing through May 19, 2009, after which the Commission will decide whether to make it final. To file a public comment, please click on the following hyperlink: http://www.ftc.gov/os/2009/04/0823145publiccomment.pdf and follow the instructions at that site.

Copies of the complaint, the proposed consent agreement, and an analysis of the agreement to aid in public comment are available from both the FTC’s Web site at http://www.ftc.gov and the FTC’s Consumer Response Center, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20580. 

NOTE: A consent agreement is for settlement purposes only and does not constitute an admission of a law violation. When the Commission issues a consent order on a final basis, it carries the force of law with respect to future actions. Each violation of such an order may result in a civil penalty of $16,000.

The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 1,500 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s Web site provides free information on a variety of consumer topics

(FTC File No. 0823145)
(Kellogg.wpd)

CONTACT INFORMATION

MEDIA CONTACT:Betsy Lordan 
Office of Public Affairs

202-326-3707



More With Kellogg #NotAnAutisticAlly


2 Replies to “Will @AutismSpeaks Maintain Their Partnership with Kellogg Or Will They Support Employee Rights And Humane Working Conditions?  | Eve Reiland #ActuallyAutistic #KelloggStrike”

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