Archived | Autism Speaks: Baby Sibs Consortium Researchers | Circa 2007 #NotAnAutisticAlly


Baby Sibs Consortium Researchers

The following researchers comprise the committee of principal investigators of the High Risk Baby Siblings Research Consortium. Each investigator actively participates in meetings, shares data and collaborates on joint projects. Each of these researchers share the common goal of identifying autism at the earliest age possible so that intervention strategies can be developed that improve the developmental trajectory of infants who may be later diagnosed with autism. They represent leaders in the field of developmental pediatrics, child psychology and infant development in the United States, Canada, and Israel

Susan Bryson, Ph.D. 
Research Chair in Autism 
Autism Research Centre
IWK Health Centre
Dalhousie University
5850 University Ave
Halifax, NS, B3J 3G9

Alice S. Carter, Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Psychology
University of Massachusetts Boston
100 Morrissey Blvd
Boston, MA 02125
http://psych.umb.edu/faculty/carter/carter.htm

Kasia Chawarska, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 
Yale University School of Medicine
Child Study Center
230 South Frontage Road
New Haven, CT 06510 
http://info.med.yale.edu/chldstdy/

John N. Constantino, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics
Washington Univ. School of Medicine
Campus Box 8134
660 South Euclid Ave
St. Louis, MI 63110 
http://www.psychiatry.wustl.edu/c/Faculty/FacultyDetails.aspx?ID=278

Geraldine Dawson, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology Center on Human Development & Disability
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195 
http://faculty.washington.edu/dawson/

Karen Dobkins, Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Psychology
Director, Infant Vision Laboratory
University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, CA 92093
http://psy.ucsd.edu/~kdobkins/ 

Deborah Fein, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology University of Connecticut
406 Babbidge Rd
Storrs, CT 06268
http://web.uconn.edu/psychology/Faculty/Fein/Fein.html

Jana Iverson, Ph.D. 
Dept. of Psychology
University of Pittsburgh
3145 Sennott Square
210 S. Bouguet Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15206 
http://www.psychology.pitt.edu/people/faculty/iverson.php

Ami Klin, Ph.D.
Harris Professor of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Yale Child Study Center
230 South Frontage Rd
New Haven, CT 06519-1124 
http://info.med.yale.edu/chldstdy/

Rebecca Landa, Ph.D. 
Director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders
and of the REACH research program, Kennedy Krieger Institute
Kennedy Krieger Institute
Dept. of Psychiatry
3901 Greenspring Ave
Baltimore, MD 21211
http://www.kennedykrieger.org/kki_staff.jsp?pid=1048

Cathy Lord, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology & Psychiatry
Director, Univ. of Michigan Autism & Communication Disorders Center
1111 East Catherine Street
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2054
http://www.umaccweb.com/

Daniel Messinger, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology and Pediatrics University of Miami
Flipse Building
P.O. Box 249229
Coral Gables, FL 33124-0751
http://www.psy.miami.edu/faculty/dmessinger/

Sally Ozonoff, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
M.I.N.D. Institute
UC Davis Health System
2825 50th Street
Sacramento, CA 95817 
http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/psychiatry/ourteam/faculty/ozonoff.html

Sally Rogers, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 
M.I.N.D. Institute
UC Davis Health System
2825 50th St.
Sacramento, CA 95817 
http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/psychiatry/ourteam/faculty/rogers.html

Marian Sigman, Ph.D. 
Director, UCLA Center for Autism Research 
University of California, Los Angeles
760 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90024-1759 
http://www.autism.ucla.edu/faculty/bio/sigman-bio.php

Wendy Stone, Ph.D. 
Professor of Pediatrics and Psychology & Human Development 
Vanderbilt Kennedy Center
Treatment & Research Institute for Autism Spectrum Disorders (TRIAD)
Peabody #74
230 Appleton Place
Nashville, TN 37203
http://www.vanderbilt.edu/psychological_sciences/stone

Helen Tager-Flusberg, Ph.D. 
Director, Lab of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 
Dept. of Anatomy & Neurobiology
Boston University School of Medicine
715 Albany Street, L-814
Boston, MA 02118-2526 
http://www.bu.edu/psych/faculty/tagerflusberg/

Nurit Yirmiya, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor
Dept. of Psychology & School of Educ. 
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Mount Scopus, Jerusalem ISRAEL 91905 
http://websites.mscc.huji.ac.il/nurityirmiya/

Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, M.D.
Associate Professor of Pediatrics 
Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital
University of Alberta
1023 – 111 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta
T5G 0B7


More with BSRC



Note/Warning:

Autistic people have fought the inclusion of ABA in therapy for us since before Autism Speaks, and other non-Autistic-led autism organizations, started lobbying legislation to get it covered by insurances and Medicaid. 

ABA is a myth originally sold to parents that it would keep their Autistic child out of an institution. Today, parents are told that with early intervention therapy their child will either be less Autistic or no longer Autistic by elementary school, and can be mainstreamed in typical education classes. ABA is very expensive to pay out of pocket. Essentially, Autism Speaks has justified the big price tag up front will offset the overall burden on resources for an Autistic’s lifetime. The recommendation for this therapy is 40 hours a week for children and toddlers.

The original study that showed the success rate of ABA to be at 50% has never been replicated. In fact, the study of ABA by United States Department of Defense was denounced as a failure. Not just once, but multiple times. Simply stated: ABA doesn’t workIn study after repeated study: ABA (conversion therapy) doesn’t work. 

What more recent studies do show: Autistics who experienced ABA therapy are at high risk to develop PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions. Historically, the autism organizations promoting ABA as a cure or solution have silenced Autistic advocates’ opposition. ABA is also known as gay conversion therapy.


The ‘cure’ for Autistics not born yet is the prevention of birth. 

The ‘cure’ is a choice to terminate a pregnancy based on ‘autism risk.’ The cure is abortion. This is the same ‘cure’ society has for Down Syndrome. 

This is eugenics 2021. Instead of killing Autistics and disabled children in gas chambers or ‘mercy killings’ like in Aktion T4, it’ll happen at the doctor’s office, quietly, one Autistic baby at a time. Different approaches yes, but still eugenics and the extinction of an entire minority group of people.


Fact: You can’t cure Autistics from being Autistic.

Fact: You can’t recover an Autistic from being Autistic.

Fact: You can groom an Autistic to mask and hide their traits. Somewhat. … however, this comes at the expense of the Autistic child, promotes Autistic Burnout (this should not be confused with typical burnout, Autistic Burnout can kill Autistics), and places the Autistic child at high risk for PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions.


[Note: Autism is NOT a disease, but a neurodevelopmental difference and disability.]


Fact: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism.


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