Archive | Autism Speaks: U.S. Supreme Court Hears Case Regarding Parents’ Rights in IEP Process | Circa October 1, 2007 #NotAnAutisticAlly

U.S. Supreme Court Hears Case Regarding Parents’ Rights in IEP Process 


Autism Speaks, through Its Federal Legal Appeals Project (FLAP), Files Amicus Brief in theTom F. case.

WASHINGTON, DC (October 1, 2007) — The Supreme Court today heard oral arguments in the Board of Education of City of New York v. Tom F., 06-637.The issue under consideration by the high court concerns a parent’s statutory right to challenge a school district’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP). According to the New York City Department of Education, even if the child’s IEP is demonstrably inappropriate, a parent should not have standing to challenge their child’s IEP unless the parent has first “tried out” the school district’s IEP.

Autism Speaks filed an amicus brief in the case, focusing on the critical nature of early intervention for children with autism. The brief explains why parents of children with autism should not be forced to “try out” demonstrably inappropriate and ineffective IEP programs during what may well be a relatively narrow window of opportunity.

“The danger of making parents try out the school district’s program first, even if it’s not an appropriate program, is that students who need early intervention waste critical time,” said Gary Mayerson, an Autism Speaks board member and founder of law firm Mayerson & Associates.

“If my child can’t swim, and the school district’s plan is to throw him in the deep end of the pool, I shouldn’t have to allow my child to drown to prove that the district’s plan is ridiculous.”

Leonard Koerner, chief appeals lawyer for New York City, said parents should be required to give the public system a shot, even if only a brief one, before they can appeal for an outside placement.

The Supreme Court is expected to deliver its decision in the case in about six weeks. Read more about the case from The Wall Street Journal. Read a transcript of the oral arguments(PDF).

The Autism Speaks Federal Legal Appeals Project is a national pro bono initiative assembled and directed by Mayerson for Autism Speaks. To date, approximately ten national profile law firms, including Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, have joined the FLAP committee with commitments to provide significant pro bono legal services at the federal level. Akin Gump attorneys Robert H. Pees, Michael D. Lockard, Amanda R. Johnson, Sunish Gulati and Evandro C. Gigante prepared the amicus brief in the Tom F case. 

ABOUT AUTISM
Autism is a complex brain disorder that inhibits a person’s ability to communicate and develop social relationships, and is often accompanied by extreme behavioral challenges. Autism spectrum disorders are diagnosed in one in 150 children in the United States, affecting four times as many boys as girls. The diagnosis of autism has increased tenfold in the last decade. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have called autism a national public health crisis whose cause and cure remain unknown.



Note/Warning:

Autistic people have fought the inclusion of ABA in therapy for us since before Autism Speaks, and other non-Autistic-led autism organizations, started lobbying legislation to get it covered by insurances and Medicaid. 

ABA is a myth originally sold to parents that it would keep their Autistic child out of an institution. Today, parents are told that with early intervention therapy their child will either be less Autistic or no longer Autistic by elementary school, and can be mainstreamed in typical education classes. ABA is very expensive to pay out of pocket. Essentially, Autism Speaks has justified the big price tag up front will offset the overall burden on resources for an Autistic’s lifetime. The recommendation for this therapy is 40 hours a week for children and toddlers.

The original study that showed the success rate of ABA to be at 50% has never been replicated. In fact, the study of ABA by United States Department of Defense was denounced as a failure. Not just once, but multiple times. Simply stated: ABA doesn’t workIn study after repeated study: ABA (conversion therapy) doesn’t work. 

What more recent studies do show: Autistics who experienced ABA therapy are at high risk to develop PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions. Historically, the autism organizations promoting ABA as a cure or solution have silenced Autistic advocates’ opposition. ABA is also known as gay conversion therapy.


The ‘cure’ for Autistics not born yet is the prevention of birth. 

The ‘cure’ is a choice to terminate a pregnancy based on ‘autism risk.’ The cure is abortion. This is the same ‘cure’ society has for Down Syndrome. 

This is eugenics 2021. Instead of killing Autistics and disabled children in gas chambers or ‘mercy killings’ like in Aktion T4, it’ll happen at the doctor’s office, quietly, one Autistic baby at a time. Different approaches yes, but still eugenics and the extinction of an entire minority group of people.


Fact: You can’t cure Autistics from being Autistic.

Fact: You can’t recover an Autistic from being Autistic.

Fact: You can groom an Autistic to mask and hide their traits. Somewhat. … however, this comes at the expense of the Autistic child, promotes Autistic Burnout (this should not be confused with typical burnout, Autistic Burnout can kill Autistics), and places the Autistic child at high risk for PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions.


[Note: Autism is NOT a disease, but a neurodevelopmental difference and disability.]


Fact: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism.


Explore Autistic History


Explore Autistic History


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